Medication Safety & Quality

User-Applied Labelling

Failure to recognise the correct container (for example; bags, bottles, syringes) for injectable medicines and fluids, or the correct conduit (for example; administration lines, invasive monitoring lines, catheters or burettes) can result in an administration error.

The Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Health Care has developed the National Standard for User-applied Labelling of Injectable Medicines, Fluids and Lines (Labelling Standard) to ensure accurate communication of injectable medicines and fluids information through standardised user-applied labelling. The Labelling Standard replaces the 2012 National Recommendations for User-applied Labelling of Injectable Medicines, Fluids and Lines[1].

The Labelling Standard and a range of resources can be found on the Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Health Care webpage.

The NSW Health Policy on User-applied Labelling of Injectable Medicines, Fluids and Lines (PD2016_058) sets out the requirements for user-applied labelling in NSW Public Health Organisations and NSW Ambulance.


References

1. Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Health Care. National Standard for User-applied Labelling of Injectable Medicines, Fluids and Lines. Sydney: ACSQHC, 2015.